How to calibrate your screen in Windows 11 or 10

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It would be nice if every display were calibrated exactly the same from the factory, but the reality is that while the default color profiles are much better than a few years ago, take the time to adjust a few settings. can make your screen a little more “pop”.

Windows 11 and 10 have a built-in app that can help streamline this process. It won’t offer the same results as professional calibration tools, but it should at least be an improvement over the default settings. (It’s also a lot cheaper; professional calibration products can be quite expensive.) Here’s how to calibrate your display in Windows 11 or 10, without breaking the bank. Note that our screenshots are from Windows 11, but the steps are the same in the previous operating system.

1. Open the “Calibrate Display Color” page in Control Panel. This is most easily done by searching for “Calibrate” in the Start menu and selecting “Calibrate Display Color” from the results. Otherwise, you will need to navigate to Settings by going to System> Display> Advanced Display, then click on “Display Adapter Properties to [Your Display]”, Then go to Color management> Color management> Advanced before clicking on the” Calibrate display “button. Finding the correct page is much faster in our experience.

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

2. Move the window to the appropriate view and click “Next”. This won’t be a problem on single monitor setups, but if you have multiple monitors you will need to drag the window to the monitor you want to calibrate before you can begin the process. Once the window appears on the appropriate display, you can click the “Next” button.

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

3. Follow the on-screen instructions or click “Next”. Windows will help you explain that you can manage your display settings on most monitors by pressing some sort of menu button. If you cannot change these settings to your liking, just click the “Next” button.

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

4. Follow the on-screen instructions and click “Next”. The application will start by having you adjust the gamma settings of your screen. Three boxes should appear, showing you what it looks like if your gamma is set too low, if it’s set too high, and if it’s set correctly. Once you understand the instructions, it is safe to click on the “Next” button.

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

5. Adjust your gamma settings. A slider on the left side of the window should allow you to change your gamma settings by dragging it up or down. (You can also click the “Reset” button to set it back to the default.) Once you have something that looks like the correct setting, go ahead and click the “Next” button.

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

6. Decide if you want to adjust the brightness and contrast. Windows offers to allow you to adjust your brightness and contrast settings if these options are available on your monitor. If not, you can click on the “Skip Brightness and Contrast Adjustment” button. Otherwise, click the “Next” button to continue with the calibration.

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

7. Follow the on-screen instructions and click the “Next” button. This time Windows should explain how adjusting the brightness settings works. After reading the explanation, you can click the “Next” button to proceed to the actual adjustment.

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

8. Adjust your brightness settings on your monitor. Windows does not offer any onscreen control for this; you will need to adjust your monitor settings while using the image provided as a reference. Click the “Next” button when you are finished.

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

9. Follow the on-screen instructions and click the “Next” button. You should now see the Windows explanation of how adjusting the contrast settings works. After reading the explanation, you can click the “Next” button to proceed to the actual adjustment.

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

ten. Adjust your contrast settings on your monitor. Windows again does not offer any onscreen controls for this; you will adjust your monitor settings directly according to the appearance of the reference image. Click the “Next” button when you are finished.

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

11. Follow the on-screen instructions and click the “Next” button. Windows should now explain how the color balance settings work. Read them and click on the “Next” button.

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

12. Adjust the sliders as needed. This time, Windows will offer not one but three sliders that you can drag to adjust the amount of red, green, and blue displayed in the gray bars. Remember that the bars are meant to be gray; seeing a tint means the colors are not balanced correctly. Click the “Next” button when you are finished.

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

13. Compare your new settings to your old ones. The screen color calibration will now present you with two buttons: “previous calibration” and “current calibration”. You can click either to make sure you like the changes you made. Clicking on the “Finish” button activates the new calibration; clicking on the “Cancel” button uses the old settings.

How to calibrate your screen in Windows 11

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Your screen is now calibrated! Windows 11 can’t handle everything, which is why the brightness and contrast sections are optional, but even adjusting the gamma and color balance settings can make a difference. Now you have a choice to make: switch to ClearType Tuner, which changes the way text is displayed, or leave all of those display settings out so you can use your newly calibrated monitor to watch something other than tools for viewing. display management.

More Windows 11 tutorials:

  1. How to get a Windows 11 ISO file and perform a clean install
  2. How to enable God Mode in Windows 11 or 10
  3. How to uninstall Windows 11 and revert to 10
  4. How to clean install Windows 11, no product key required
  5. How to install Windows 11 in a virtual machine


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